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Pacific Yurts' Blog

Just How Tough Are Pacific Yurts Anyway?

Posted by admin on July 22, 2011 in Maintenance with No Comments


Oak tree on Pacific Yurt

Fallen oak on yurt

As Pacific Yurts employees arrived for work on Tuesday, July 19th, 2011 they were greeted by a fallen sixty foot oak tree. Some time early that morning the mighty oak had given up trying to hold itself vertical and fell over on its side.

Unfortunately it fell directly onto one of the display yurts on the property.

A question that is often asked about the Pacific Yurt is, “what if a tree limb falls onto the yurt?” Well, here is documentation of exactly what happened when the whole tree fell on it.

Fallen oak

From the initial inspection around the yurt it didn’t look too bad, but we were a little concerned about what it would look like when we went inside for a look around. We were prepared for the possibility of having to replace a few rafters and some of the lath that make up the lattice wall. Part of the beauty of our yurt construction is the ease with which you can make repairs or replace broken components, so we weren’t too worried.

A close inspection of the yurt interior had surprising results. Not a single piece of the yurt framework was cracked or damaged in any way! In fact, it looked as if there were only a few punctures in the top cover and roof insulation, but we still had to get the huge tree off the yurt without causing any further damage before a full inspection could be done.

Pacific Yurt interior damage

Interior before removing tree

After making a few calls we hired some local professionals who carefully and methodically removed the tree piece by piece. By Tuesday evening the entire tree had been removed from the site.

Wednesday morning we could finally get a good look at the entire yurt, inside and out, to make a full assessment of the damage the old oak tree had caused. To everyone’s amazement the four punctures in the roof and insulation were the only damage that the yurt sustained!

By the end of Wednesday’s work day the insulation and top cover had been repaired and visitors who stopped by had no idea that just one day prior there had been a sixty foot oak tree resting on the yurt. Amazingly enough the total cost for repair items was $27.50. This includes a top cover patch kit, liner patch kit and a roll of foil tape. The cost of having the tree removed was offset by the amount of firewood the tree provided.

To remember the graceful old oak tree we saved a mossy section of it and created a bench for our visitors.

 

Pacific Yurt after tree removal

Spring Maintenance

Posted by admin on June 3, 2011 in Maintenance with No Comments


Spring is here and the landscape is coming alive with color. This is the ideal time for yurt owners to do a little maintenance. Keeping your yurt clean and well maintained will not only keep it looking good, but also provide increased longevity. Below are a few tips for keeping your beautiful Pacific Yurt looking good and lasting longer.

Pacific Yurt maintenance

Cleaning the top cover

An accumulation of dirt or soiling can create an ideal environment for bacteria to grow and cause staining of the fabric. It is important that this be removed regularly to maintain the appearance and longevity of the fabric. Both top and side covers should be cleaned at least twice a year with a mild soap and warm water. We have found this to be the least aggressive to the fabric. In areas where tree sap and leaves are a problem, it may be necessary to clean the yurt more often. Recommendations for cleaning include hand scrubbing with a soft bristle brush using a ladder around the lower perimeter areas and using the dome opening for access to the top areas. A swimming pool brush with an extension handle would be a good investment for this purpose. Be sure to protect the top cover with a blanket or cardboard before attaching a rope or strong cord to the dome and sliding it down off the roof to someone at the perimeter who can ‘catch’ it and carefully set it to the side.  If mildew is ever found growing on the cover, it should be removed with soap and water. In the event the top or side cover ever becomes torn or punctured, it can be repaired with a patch kit available from Pacific Yurts.

If the side cover has any horizontal wrinkles, it can be smoothed out by simply tightening the cord that connects the top and side covers.  If the side cover has any vertical wrinkles this means that it should be pulled tighter around the circumference of the yurt. To do this the screws at the bottom of the side cover should be removed and any excess fabric pulled toward the door, where it can be moved around the door sticker and re-secured. The screws at the bottom of the side cover can then be re-installed. Having a nice tight side cover will improve aesthetics, reduce wind noise and provide a better seal against air infiltration.

Check to make sure the top cover valance cord is pulled tight and secured to the door frame.

The door handle should be lubricated regularly with graphite or Teflon based lubricant.

The exterior of the door & door frame should be re-coated with a cedar semi-transparent stain (or equivalent) every year. If done regularly this requires minimal effort and keeps the beautiful appearance of the wood door. Applying a few coats of Tung oil over the door’s finish is inexpensive and helps to protect the coating.

If the fabric of your top or side cover has become stiff, brittle or tears easily the cover is likely at or near the end of its usable life. Replacement covers are available from Pacific Yurts. Pricing information can be found on our website. You can contact our customer service representatives by email or by calling 1-800-944-0240.